Author Archives: Talk About Giving blog team

Charitable Birthday: Giving Books

posted by Talk About Giving blog team

July 16, 2012 @ 1:49 pm

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We heard from a Talk About Giving follower today who is interested in hosting a charitable birthday party for her child and collecting new or gently used books in lieu of gifts. So we checked with our resident librarian (yes, we actually have one right here in our office leading the Literacy 2030 initiative!) as to what organizations in the Midlands collect books for children. And when considering this, it’s difficult not to pause and reflect on the issue of illiteracy right here in our backyard. More


Question of the Week: The Money Tree

posted by Talk About Giving blog team

July 13, 2012 @ 8:30 am

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TAG Question of the Week

“What do you think? We have a money tree in the backyard?”

It’s hard not to wonder if people really do think that money grows on trees, particularly in this day and age. Over the past several decades, our culture has really changed from that perspective. We want it now and we want it fast and we want it to be the best of the best. Oh, and when it’s outdated, we’ll just get a new one. You know, like next week. More


What Do Your Children Care About?

posted by Talk About Giving blog team

July 11, 2012 @ 3:40 pm

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Our primary motivation in charitable giving is rooted in making a difference. Whether it’s supporting an institution or organization that is meaningful to us personally, or taking a stand in support of a cause we believe in, the majority of people simply believe in the value of giving. Giving is intrinsically good and right.

But taking it a step further, we support that which we are passionate. And everyone’s passion is different. Throughout life we are influenced by others and our experiences and as we grow our values evolve.

In teaching our children about giving, we have a unique opportunity to help them explore their own talents and passions. By talking with our children about what they care about, we can find ways for them to make a difference while learning about a subject near and dear to them. If they care about animals, help them research the different rescue organizations or shelters and select one to share their lemonade sale profits or allowance with. If they’re interested in science look at local science museums or the planetarium and talk about their needs and ways to get involved together. More


Four Conversations You Should Have with Your Teen

posted by Talk About Giving blog team

July 5, 2012 @ 9:00 am

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Most of us expect our children to complete some sort of household responsibilities, whether that’s cleaning their bedroom, unloading the dishwasher, or taking out the trash. We give them chores not because we want a clean house (ok, well, that’s part of the reason), but because we are teaching them to become responsible, self-sufficient adults.

The same principle applies for teaching our children to give. We’re not including our children in our family’s philanthropic activities simply so they’ll be aware that we make charitable donations. Rather, we hope to give them the values and tools they’ll need to become adults who care about making a difference in their world. More


Family Influence

posted by Talk About Giving blog team

June 25, 2012 @ 4:35 pm

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We’re all familiar with the research. The number one influence in a child’s development is home and family. In some ways this is enlightening and in other ways it’s kind of frightening. What we do really does impact our children’s behaviors and habits. From the earliest days, babies follow their parents’ moves, mimic their expressions and respond to their actions. And this influence grows as the child develops cognitively. More